Articles by: Ankit Patel

Words You Use Can Change Your Bottom Line

Asking someone “How was your day” vs asking “What was the best part of your day” will usually get you two very different answers.  The usual response to how was your day is at best “fine.”  When you ask what was the best part of your day it forces a person to think through and tell you the high part of their day and it elicits different emotions.  This sounds great and you might be thinking like I did “Positivitiy is great but how does it help the business other than it’s a nicer place to work?”  Being a nice place to work has it’s benefits from reducing turn over to higher engagement of employees.  Aside from that there is some research that shows the amount of positive comments to negative comments can affect sales performance directly.

Framework for Change Management Part V

This the final post about a change management frame work ATEEP.  We’ve covered alignment in Framework for Change Management Part I , team in Framework for Change Management Part II,  experimenting in Framework for Change Management Part III, and execution in Framework for Change Management Part IV. The last step is the one that almost no one will pay attention to.  That is how to make the changes permanent.  Another way to say this is how do you make it a part of the fabric of the company.  The usual way to do this is to create meeting, metrics, or other management tools.  Usually this is helpful but not enough.  To create something as part of your culture you need other items like stories, artifacts, and rewards.  A story is simply what gets shared from person to person.  It’s important to highlight a story and repeat it so that everyone understand the message.  One example of a story is the story of how Google started off in a garage and grew to a giant corporation.  Or the story of how the Facebook founder came up with the idea for Facebook.   Artifacts are that are usually physical that reinforce the culture you want.  An example of this would be t-shirts talking about the non profit that the company supports or even placards that you keep next to your ID badge.  With rewards it can be both monetary and non-monetary.  Non-monetary rewards can be public praise, highlighting exceptional performance, or even a thank you for doing something related to the change you want.

Framework for Change Management Part IV

ATEEP is the framework that we use to help accelerate and make change stick.  We’ve covered alignment in Framework for Change Management Part I , team in Framework for Change Management Part II, and experimenting in Framework for Change Management Part III.  Once you have your solution execution is next in the change framework.  At this point you have to take what you’ve learned and role it out to the entire organization.  Now this may sound easy but can be the most difficult part.  Especially if you haven’t done the first 3 parts properly.  One of the tools you want to use is a RACI.  This is a way to determine who is Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, and Informed during the role out process.  Another tool you will want to use is a scope document where you highlight was is in scope and out of scope.  There are standard project management tools that are very effective if you have the proper Alignment, Team, and Experiments that will produce the results you want.

Framework for Change Management Part III

ATEEP is the framework that we use to help accelerate and make change stick.  We’ve covered alignment in Framework for Change Management Part I and team in Framework for Change Management Part II.  This post we’ll cover the first E experimentation.  Before we talk about experimenting I want to first talk about the difference between learning goals and performance goals.  A performance goal is a goal that most of us are familiar with.  Something like I want to loose 10 pounds in 6 months, or we want to reduce defects by 5%.  A learning goal would be “I want to learn nutrition science and change psychology so that I can loose 10 pounds.”  Another example would be “We want to learn how to produce a better widget so that we can reduce the defects by 5%.”  Th subtle difference is that we don’t assume we know he answer with learning goals.  Experimenting is part of the learning process and you won’t always be  succeeding.  This is an important part – you will not be successful with every experiment you run.

Framework for Change Management Part II

ATEEP is the framework that we use to help accelerate and make change stick.  We’ve covered alignment in Framework for Change Management Part I.  This post we’ll cover T(eam) and why it’s important to the goals you want to achieve.  Team refers to the people that you decide to put in charge to get the project done.  When you put together a team you are not only putting technical experts but it’s important to put influencers as well.  We’ve found that you need about 40-60% of the workforce involved in some way with the project to create a tipping point.  It can be as low as 20% if you have the right influencers on the team but not all teams have such strong influencers.

Framework for Change Management Part I

In the last post How to Triple Your Chances of Hitting Your 2017 Productivity and Quality Goals we talked about how addressing behavior is just as important as technical changes when it comes to achieving hard goals.  We used the frame work ATEEP:

A -Alignment
T -Team
E -Experiment
E -Execute
P -Permanence

How to Triple Your Chances of Hitting Your 2017 Productivity and Quality goals

 

Lean Manufacturing Concepts and How to Use Them Part II


In a previous article, Lean Manufacturing Concepts and How to Use Them Part I, we talked about wastes, flow, and over burdening as core concepts of Lean.  For part II we are going to look at autonomation (aka jidoka) and continuous improvement (aka kaizen) and radical change/improvement (aka kaikaku).

Lean Manufacturing Concepts And How to Use Them Part I

In Lean manufacturing the top three concepts you need to know about are Muda (Waste), Mura (Flow), Muri (overburdening).   For why and how these three concepts became the focus of Lean Manufacturing read Is Lean Right for My Company.  Waste is defined as Transportation Inventory Motion   Waiting Over-production Over-processing Defects or the acronym TIM WOOD.  Flow is how well a product moves through it’s path with minimal issues and as fast as possible.  Overburdening refers to the people working.  Are you giving them too much work and how do you know if you are?  On the flip side you also want to understand how to determine value as well.

Is Lean Right for My Company?

The answer is absolutely and Hell no!  Let me go in to detail as to why it’s both.  Lean manufacturing has a history spanning back over 100 years informally and formally since Toyota in the 1960s.  It’s grown to other industries and goes by names like Lean Healthcare, Lean Government, Lean for Offices, Lean for Services, Lean IT, Lean for Financial Industry, Lean Startup, Agile, etc.  In all its forms Lean is used as a way to deliver better service/products to the customer and reduce inefficiencies.  At least what most would consider Lean.  I want to introduce another framing and that Lean is designed to be competitive in your market.

« Previous PageNext Page »